Posts Tagged ‘John Wesley’

May I have your attention, please?

I’ve been reading The Attention Merchants for fun between classes, & as everyone is posting “New Years’ Thoughts/Resolutions”, I thought this was an important time to share the surprising insight from the author…

“If we think of attention as a resource or even a kind of currency, we must allow that it is always, necessarily, being ‘spent’. There is no saving it for later.” (pg.20)wesley.apple

“(speaking of developments in political advertising) With its combination of moral injunctions as well as daily and weekly rituals, organized religion had long taken human attention as its essential substrate.  This is especially true of monotheisms, whose demands for a strict adherence to the one true God naturally promote an ideal of undivided attention.  Among early Christians, for example, total attention to God implied ceaseless prayer.  The early Church father Clement of Alexandria wrote of the “Perfect Christian” as one who “prays throughout his entire life, endeavoring by prayer to have fellowship with God.” Likewise the desert monastics of the fourth century took as their aim “to maintain there as near as possible a ceaseless vigil of prayer, punctuated only by the minimal interruption for food and sleep.”

“Such an aspiration to monopolize the attention of believers was hardly abandoned after Christianity’s early days.  Some 1700 years later, John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, prescribed various means for keeping the mind attuned to God, such as the practice of thinking of him immediately upon waking, right before falling asleep, for at least an hour during the day, and before taking any important action.  (This discipline shares some similarity with the Jewish practice of offering brachot, or blessings, at various routine moments, such as before eating or drinking, or more exceptional ones, as when thunder is heard, among other practices codified in the Mishnah in the third century CE.)”

“To be sure, it isn’t as if before the twentieth century everyone was walking around thinking of God all the time.  Nevertheless, the Church was the one institution whose mission depended on galvanizing attention; and through its daily and weekly offices, as well as its sometimes central role in education, that is exactly what it managed to do.  At the dawn of the attention industries, then, religion was still, in a very real sense, the incumbent operation, the only large-scale human endeavor designed to capture attention and use it.  But over the twentieth century, organized religion, which had weathered the doubts raised by the Enlightenment, would prove vulnerable to other claims on and uses for attention.  Despite the promise of eternal life, faith in the West declined and has continued to do so, never faster than in the twenty-first century.  Offering new consolations and strange gods of their own, the commercial rivals for human attention must surely figure into this decline.  Attention, after all, is ultimately a zero-sum game.” (Pgs.26-27, The Attention Merchants, Tim Wu)

Translation?  The things we purchase, and technology/apps we use may be affordable or even free, but there is always a cost involved.  When that cost involves our attention during moments previously available to contemplation, quiet, prayer, & offering ourselves to discover the needs/desires/joys/pains of God & others – we may benefit from asking if we can/should really afford the price.

Question for conversation: Is it more redemptive to abstain from creating/posting content – helping spread subversive critique on consumption of social media, or to sparingly & creatively post content that points those who consume toward the Love and Truths of God?   How have you seen either – done well?

In any case – may we be people who invite our children & young people to think about these things.  May this be a year where we realize there are always prices unlisted.  May we seek redemptive ways to interact, create, and live together.  May we not be defined purely as amused consumers, or anxious responders, but discover new ways to offer Faith, Hope & Love creatively as New Creations ourselves…

 

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Luv is a Verb (part 2)

So what does THAT look like? It seems to look, like Love. Not love like feelings and mushy stuff and roses. But love like laying down a life for ones’ friends. Love like sacrificing our own desires, and letting go of self preservation for the sake of living naturally as one through whom God loves. It’s not an effort-based thing either, not something they’ve been trying really really hard at, in an attempt to look like the loving Christian they know they’re supposed to be. Like the toddler earlier, it’s not an obsessive compulsion to make sure Loving acts are happening regularly. It’s a natural, and often “giddy” outflow of what exists in the heart sourced in Christ.

King Jesus tells them “for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me. I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.”

I always forget this next verse comes from BOTH those who followed Jesus, and those who did not. They’re taken back, surprised, and ask the King, “Lord, when was this?” They had NO IDEA they were serving and showing love to Jesus. They were simply living out of the New Creation they had been transformed to be. They were living naturally out of the heart of God. It might be tempting in our walk with Jesus to think, “I know God wants me to love each person as if I were loving Jesus himself. So I’m just going to pretend each person I bump into is Jesus.”

But if I look into the face of every person I meet, and only see Jesus, I’m missing out on the beauty and uniqueness of all the individual lives and ways God has shown his creativity. God doesn’t look down on us, and forget our names, faces, and stories, seeing only Jesus. But because of what Jesus has done, God is able to look fully at each of us as individuals. Your name, your story, and all the unique ways He has created you to reflect bits and pieces of God into the world. THAT is how we love, because that is how we have BEEN loved! Once again, the child of God can only do that which they see the Father doing.

So we see the people of God, not aiming for larger mansions in heaven. Not loving the least of these because they know it’s part of their Christian duty. Not even because they see Jesus in every face around them. But because their very nature has been changed. Their reflex is no longer “Self”. Their reflex has become “Love”, even to the very least of these. To those our world overlooks, tramples underfoot, and has forgotten about. Those our world is afraid of touching, or even just, afraid of. To the very last in line, the follower of Jesus is broken as God’s heart is broken toward them. Desiring justice. Desiring to care for them. The orphan, the widow, the poor, the hungry, the powerless, the voiceless, the sick, those with nothing to offer us in return. The people of God naturally reach out in love, with the heart of God. And in each of these cases, it makes us vulnerable. It costs something. It may lead us the way of the cross.

In his book, Bob Goff writes, “That’s because love is never stationary. In the end, love doesn’t just keep thinking about it or keep planning for it. Simply put: love does.”

Or as DC Talk put it back in the 90’s, “Luv is a verb”

This is not a foreign concept to us, as Free Methodists either. John Wesley wrote, “This is the sum of Christian perfection: It is all comprised in that one word, Love. The first branch of it is the love of God: And as he that loves God loves his brother also, it is inseparably connected with the second: “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.” Thou shalt love every man as thy own soul, as Christ loved us.”

It seems so simple. It seems a little mushy even. And yet we can’t get away from the fact that it seems to be completely tied to those who anticipate the coming justice and reign of Jesus as Lord fully over all things. It makes these “acts of love” even more vital, and even more connected to what is coming as the Son of Man returns to sit on His Throne. Because we are not just loving to make someone feel good. We are loving as a powerfully subversive statement that says, even in the midst of laws and cultures that say otherwise – LOVE like God’s is the way of my Citizenship. It is the way of my King.

So what is our challenge this morning, in the midst of these Truths? How do we ensure that we don’t end up like the second group? This group may have had a large and honest love for Jesus, because they genuinely wanted to be saved from sin, and wanted to enjoy heaven for eternity. They say to Him, “Wait….when did we even see you, and have a chance to offer you food, drink, clothes, or invite you in?” To them Jesus gives the same response, “..just as you did or didn’t do for the least of these, who are members of my family, so you did for me.”

How do we begin moving in the direction of the first group, who’s knee-jerk response was to love without regard? Based on what we hear Jesus describing in his response about what the son can do, it would seem we first need to start with realizing what the Father is doing. And what the Father IS doing? is loving.

God. Loves.

God Loves you, no matter what you come from, and no matter how you’ve lived toward Him. God loves you, whether you’re important and people listen to you, or you have very little influence and a timid voice. Whether you are a decision maker, or whether life pretty much dictates what road you have to travel. God loves you.

But also, God loves them. The people on the other side of the street, that make so much noise or act so different it makes you uncomfortable. God loves them. Those imprisoned for making horrible choices, and living what seems to be comfortably in broken lives. God loves them. Those who completely disagree with you theologically, politically, and work hard to make sure your efforts fail. God loves them. You. Love. Them.

And as we’ve talked about already, Love is a verb. God loves you. God loves them. God is pouring out His Spirit to unite your heart with His, so that you can actually experience Love for your enemies. So that you can be broken with God’s heart for them. So that you can look at the least of these, and not see Jesus, but actually see someone who is called “BELOVED” by God. So that you can look in the mirror, and not see your accomplishments or your failures, but actually see someone who is called “BELOVED” by God.

What if this week, as people are making giant lists of things they’re thankful for. For homes, for food, for clothes, for comforts, or many other blessings. What if you became united in solidarity with those who have very little thanks to offer, beyond the love of God? I’m not saying cancel your family dinner, and tell all the relatives you’re going down to work in the soup kitchen instead….although you’re certainly welcome to do so. What I’m saying is, to be aware of how beloved you are. To exist, as my Pastor has said before, with the “radical preoccupation with the preciousness of others.”

To ask God even now, that He would give you His heart. That he would transform your mind. That his ways of love in our world would be revealed to you, so that you can do exactly what you see Him doing. So that you can love in such a response to the love of God that you forget you even heard this story about it being Jesus you’re loving.

That will naturally look different in each of our lives. Each of us has a unique place in our communities and families. Each of us has unique things we can offer in love to others. But each of us has….LOVE. Love that responds to hunger with food. Love that responds to thirst with drink. Love that responds to those left out by inviting them in. Love that clothes the naked, cares for the sick, and visits those imprisoned.

Not because doing these things earns us the right to be called “Sheep”. But because we have been made into New Creations. We have been born again as Children of God, and have received New Life in Christ. We are made free from sin – for a reason. The justice of God is coming one day fully in Jesus Christ. We look forward to that day. And we proclaim that day, by living under His Lordship even now. By acting according to the ways of His Kingdom. Citizens not of the law, but of Love in which the law finds it’s perfect fulfillment.

It’s why we serve, and work toward the justice of God, even though we know it will fall short until Jesus returns. Because as we read in 1 Corinthians 13:7, “Love never gives up, never loses faith, is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance.”

The altar is open this morning, as we close with a final hymn, “Come, All Christians Be Committed”. A hymn of invitation that speaks about offering our lives to the Lord, and offering our love to each other.

Maybe you’ve already made the commitment to accept Jesus as your savior. But maybe today, you’ve heard God calling you to make a commitment to Love as God loves. To become saved not simply for yourself, but for the sake of being enabled to show love to others. Whatever the case, or if you simply want to thank God for His love….I invite you to respond to God for a moment before you click out of here and go about your day…

Luv is a Verb (part 1)

Matthew 25:31-46 – (passage where King Jesus takes the throne, divides the nations as sheep & goats, and they both ask “When did we see you, to be able to help you?” Jesus tells them, “Whatever you did for the least of these, you’ve done to me.”)

Our world is in need of the justice of God. It’s discouraging to look out over the evils that are taking place on a daily basis. Children who are abused and trampled on. Our brothers and sisters who exist without any voice about the condition of their environment or life trajectories. Women, girls, and boys who are raped or sold as slaves, objects for men to consume.

Increasingly, there IS a global desire for justice. On October 24, 1945, the United Nations was formed. The “UN” has efforts in many parts of the world, and it’s reach continues to increase. Unfortunately, “justice” is not quite the appropriate word for what often happens. In one moment most recently celebrated, the DRC finally saw the trial and conviction of a man who had served as a General in the Congolese armed forces. He was accused of arbitrary execution, rape, arbitrary arrest, torture, illegal detention, and the use of child soldiers. He is also being held accountable for at least 2 separate massacres back in 2003 where hundreds were killed. So what was the justice recently celebrated by the UN? This General was given a 10 year prison sentence. No comments were made about rehabilitation or transforming the man’s life, or restoring honor to those communities that were injured.

Even here in Decatur, IL, “justice” is a flawed concept and people are being shuffled around like objects. Sitting in county jail cells for months and even years, eventually they are spit out to a long-term facility, often with little or no attention to having a life transformed, or healing the relationship between the offender and the society that was offended. In the case of the hungry, even this weekend, food will be given to over 4,000 families! This is a huge effort, and a beautiful thing. But looking at it honestly, we know that some will take advantage of it. All of our human efforts at Justice will ultimately fall short, until the day described in our passage this morning. Still, these things are important. Still, we make efforts out of love.

But we need so much more than we can accomplish on our own. Enter: Jesus, and His Kingdom. This is much bigger, Jesus says, than something happening in your heart. This is so much more important than you getting into Heaven. This is the kind of thing meant to transform all of creation. As Howard Snyder has written in one of the books that should be on your reading list for 2015 (after the Bible, of course): “Salvation Means Creation Healed”.

If we began reading this passage with verse 32, we might start to think this is another parable about the Kingdom of Heaven. After all, Jesus has been talking about this for a while now, with stories about the Bridesmaids, and the Talents. He’s reminded his disciples to always be ready, and to use what they’ve been given faithfully in service to their master. In our passage today, several times it simply says, “Then the King will say/answer them…” But we know this is no parable. This is a coming reality!

Verse 31 says, “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory.” THIS IS GOING TO HAPPEN!! Of course, the disciples thought this was all going to happen in their lifetime, with Jesus actually becoming the power that sets Rome in it’s place. But we don’t hear Jesus worrying too much about proving His authority over Rome here. Verse 32 proclaims that “ALL the nations will be gathered before him..”

There is no power, or group, or voice, or influence that falls outside of the Lordship of Christ, that has already begun and will be revealed fully one day. That should fill us with immense confidence and enthusiasm for what God has in store! But what that confidence looks like, comes as a surprise to the followers of Jesus, and might surprise us if we’re honest as well. Because it’s not about changing legislation to make more room for religion.

Before we go further, it’s important here to remember that we are not saved by what we DO. Ephesians 2:8 reminds us, “For it is by GRACE you have been saved, not by works…it is a gift from God so that no man can boast.”

And yet we also know that if anyone is in Christ, they are a NEW CREATION. Old things have passed away, and all things have become new. God does a work in our hearts, and we’re offered salvation from sin – both it’s future impact, and it’s present burdens.

How do you know if a toddler has learned how to walk? You see them giggling with excitement, walking, running, and stumbling all over the place! It’s not an obsessive compulsion to practice walking so that they can increase in their ability. It’s a natural desire to exist in a path of freedom they’ve never before experienced!

So in this passage, we seem to be reminded that a life lived with Christ must transform not only our hearts, but our lives as well. It includes a scripture that we don’t like to talk much about these days, and yet there it is. The Son of Man, who is seated finally on the Throne of Glory over all nations, gathers the people before Him and separates them. Now remember, these are not ACTUAL sheep and goats. It’s simply giving us an example of HOW they are being separated. That is to say, easily. Even though they may run in the same herd, a shepherd (or even most of us) would have no trouble identifying a goat in the midst of sheep. Jesus can easily tell if someone has allowed His Love to offer them salvation from a life lived in sin. There’s no complex supernatural equation, or comparing a list of good deeds or bad deeds. We learn a bit more about this in a few verses.

But first we have verse 34, where we have a long awaited arrival of complete Justice. The kind of Justice David wrote about in Psalm 69 when he sang, “Save me, O God, for the waters have come up to my neck. I sink in deep mire, where there is no foothold; I have come into deep waters, and the flood sweeps over me. I am weary in my crying; my throat is parched. My eyes grow dim with waiting for my God.”

To David, and to all with him, King Jesus says “Come, you who are blessed by my Father, receive your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world..”

So we have a group of people, set apart easily by God because of the natural and observable difference in their lives. They receive this inheritance, which is important to recognize here. This is not a wage they earned, or a reward they deserve. This is an inheritance, provided simply because they are children of God. And how does God know they are his children?

If only we had an example of what it looked like when a child…say, a son…..of God came and lived among us. If only we could see what it would look like.

John 5:19 tells us, “..the Son can do nothing by himself, he can do only what he sees his Father doing, because whatever the Father does the Son also does.”

So we have our example, and so it seems to be what has happened. These who are receiving their inheritance seem to have been transformed into New Creations in Christ, having not only received salvation from Sin, but actually “made new” so that their very source of life, and outpouring of their life, is completely different than before.

So what does THAT look like?  Stay tuned for Part 2 of this post….

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